Plan of Guadalupe

Posted on 27 March 2013 by Administrator

The Council of Mexico celebrated today the Plan of Guadalupe inititated on 26 march 1913. The plan of Guadalupe was a document drafted on march 23, 1913 by Venustiano Carranza in response to the overthrow and execution of Francisco I. Madero, then president of Mexico. Tt was formally proclaimed three days later on march 26 in Carranza’s Hacienda.

Madero’s overthrow was the work of Victoriano Huerta, who was Madero’s top general and had sided with the opposition forces during the Mexican revolution. The document accused Huerta of restoring a dictatorship and committing treason by executing the constitutional leader of Mexico.

There were seven parts to this plan which purported to remove any claim of legitimacy Huerta’s government might have had, reinstated government powers into officials loyal to Madero, and announced a call for elections once peace had been restored to the country.

This document was the immediate answer of the constitutionalists forces against the military coup d’etat against the Madero regime which, from its inception confronted uprisings from civilian and military groups discontent with its way of governing, seeking the restoration of the Porfirista regime.
for the Plan of Guadalupe, Venustiano Carranza would say in 1917, was “the war cry that the most select of the Mexican youth propelled to the four corners of the nation against the triumphant iniquity, and that cry was no more than the vibrant and sonorous expression of the national conscience, an expression that re-assumed the firm intention, the deliberate will of the Mexican people of not consenting any more to a pretorianism that would again seize the destinies of the nation. Under such virtue, with the Plan of Guadalupe was perfectly planted – the issue of legality against the usurpation of the law, against the disturbance of the free institutions; against the military dictatorship.”